UKYA

Celebrating Young Adult fiction by UK authors


UKYA Top Books of 2013 Part 3

mooseMoose Baby by Meg Rosoff – a clever, very funny novel about a teenage girl who gives birth to a moose. Proof – if you needed it – that novels for dyslexic readers can be satirical, witty and surprising.  Picked by Sally Nicholls whose latest novel is Close Her Pretty Eyes.

 

 

 

Rose-Under-Fire-UKAlso picked by Sally Nicholls: Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein. I loved books about prison camps when I was a teenager (should I admit that here?) and this book reminded me why. Less about death, and much more about surviving with dignity and humour. Also contains aeroplanes.

 

 

 

17205536You Don’t Know Me by Sophia Bennett: a clear-eyed insight into the machinations of TV talent shows and internet hate campaigns from a wholly unexpected point of view; warm, kind and chock full of positive female friendships. Picked by Susie Day, author of Pea’s Book of Best Friends.

 

 

 

lost girlAlso picked by Susie: The Lost Girl by Sangu Mandanna: striking debut set in a near-future where the wealthy can ‘weave’ themselves a spare body. Eva is one such replacement. A Frankenstein retelling, set in the Lake District and India: chills, thrills, romance and beautiful writing.

 

 

 

IrisAfter Iris by Natasha Farrant…it’s funny, touching and beautifully written.Picked by Caroline Green, author of Cracks.

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UKYA Top Books of 2013 part 2

topquietnessKaren Saunders, author of Me, Suzy P : The Quietness by Alison Rattle  is a beautifully written piece of historical fiction, and a fascinating insight into the darker side of Victorian society.

 

 

 

Teri Terry, author of Slated and Fractured: Shine by Candy Gourlay, because it sutopshinerprised me, went places I wasn’t expecting, and I got lost in reading it as a reader without analyzing it the whole time (not something I manage as often as I’d like)

 

 

Sophia Bennett, author of the Threads series, The Look and You Don’t Know Me: 417zg-BNx9L._SY445_Cruel Summer by James Dawson. Great characters, great horror references and some brilliant twists. Great cover too.

 

 

 

ghosthawkKatie Moran, author of  Bloodline and  Hidden Among Us:  Ghost Hawk by Susan Cooper, a beautiful and brutal account of the years following first contact between European settlers and the Native American tribes they encountered. It has the most shocking plot twist I’ve ever read, too.”

 

 

CJ Daugherty, author of the Night School series: The Falconer by Elizabeth May. Feisty female lead, evocative Scottish setting and a falconergenuinely steamy romance. Also steam punk elements, fairies and lots of FIGHTING. Addictive as hell.


UKYA Books of the Year 2013: Part 1

It’s that time of year again…we’re asking writers, bloggers and other bookish people to pick their UKYA books of the year.  Starting today with picks from awesome UKYA authors Lee Weatherly, Zoe Marriott, James Dawson and Rhian Ivory.  Feel free to add your picks of the year in the comments.

More tomorrow!

untitledGeek Girl by Holly Smale. Picked by Lee Weatherly, author of the Angel trilogy: ‘ I really loved it; thought it was SO funny.’  Good news for other Geek Girl fans –  and there are many-  Holly has been signed for three more Geek Girl books.

 

 

 

ShadowsShadows by Robin McKinley. Picked by Zoe Marriott, author of the Name of the Blade trilogy: ‘Shadows shows exactly why the author is a legend. Her magical world – almost but not quite like the real one – is so multi-textured and well-grounded that it was a surprise everytime I put it down and realised I didn’t live there myself. And anyone who has ever been oppressed by the supreme delight of McKinley’s animal characters will also find much to love in Shadows’.

 

 

 

tinderTinder by Sally Gardner. Picked by James Dawson, author of  Cruel Summer: ‘ A scary, evocative gothic fairytale.’

 

 

 

James also picked Dawn O’Porter’s Paper Aeroplanes: ‘A gritty but hilarious coming-of-age untitledfriendship story.

 

 

 

untitledThe Bone Dragon by Alexia Casale, picked by Rhian Ivory, author of The Bad Girls Club (as Rhian Tracey) : ‘Beautifully written, dealing with a very sensitive subject matter in an innovative and believable manner.’